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Articles from the May 1, 2020 edition


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  • May 2020 Cover

    May 1, 2020

    Rick Franks taxis out in the Hurricane XIIB, marked in the colors of No. 1 Squadron, RCAF....

  • Hangar Flying

    Randle Corfman, President Minnesota Pilots Association|May 1, 2020

    We are all pretty worn down by the precautions that were electively taken by our governor with regard to the COVID-19 virus, and many of us are pretty much over it. It is time to get back to doing the things that make us happy, not to mention productive. I know that it was with heavy heart that we cancelled the 2020 Great Minnesota Aviation Gathering, that Sun-N-Fun was cancelled, and that we learned of the postponing of the Minnesota Seaplane Pilots Safety Seminar to the fall of 2020. While...

  • "AMONG THE FEW"

    Tom Foster|May 1, 2020

    British Prime Minister Winston Churchill had a way with the English language. He also liked the sound of his own voice. Many of his speeches in Parliament lasted so long that some members were nearly comatose by the end. On August 20, 1940 Churchill made a typically long speech concerning the status of the war with Germany. He paid tribute to all the people defending Britain against the aggressors, but buried in the speech is this single sentence that has an important place in aviation history....

  • From the Archives - June 2000

    Dan McDowell|May 1, 2020

    Most aviators recognize the power of lightning, but few understand this unique natural phenomenon. Take time to review a few facts about lightning. 1. A typical thunderstorm lasts about 30 minutes. 2. Though most tend to occur in the afternoon and evening during the spring and summer, thunderstorms can occur at any time of the day and along frontal boundaries. 3. Lightning can strike as far as 15 miles away from a thunderstorm. 4. Lightning can occur when it is not raining. 5. Deaths caused by...

  • From the Archives - March 2000

    Dan McDowell|May 1, 2020

    When we think about how far air travel and space travel have come since the first drawings of da Vinci to the most recent flight of the space shuttle, we are truly amazed. Now imagine what can be coming in the next century or even just in the next ten years! It is mind-boggling. While those thoughts are in your head, why not have a little fun with a little aviation/space trivia test? The questions are in random order and are taken from three national sources of aviation and space information. 1. What aviation safety device predates the advent o...

  • Stein Air

    Jim Hanson|May 1, 2020

    As the former operator of the Faribault FBO, I continue to watch the "goings-on" there. Faribault is a unique airport-a small-town airport located close enough to the metro area to draw a wide variety of pilots and aircraft. It is home to homebuilders, antique aircraft owners, balloonists, a first-rate maintenance shop, a thriving and well-respected rebuilder of antique airplanes, a first-class commercial glider operation, one of the oldest pilot associations in the state, and now, Stein Air....

  • FAAST

    Al Alwin, CFI, Wright Brothers Master Pilot|May 1, 2020

    Groucho Marx once said; “Age is not a particularly interesting subject. Anyone can get old. All you have to do is live long enough”. It shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone that we are not going to live forever. However, while we’re here, we want to enjoy the trip and “squeeze the last bit of juice out of the orange.” Age sneaks up on us while we’re busy living life, but taps us on the shoulder when we attempt to taxi over chocks, forget frequencies, or miss radio calls. Growing older doesn’t have to result in becoming an unsafe pilot. W...

  • Confessions of an Airshow Announcer-Merlin Magic

    Tom Lymburn|May 1, 2020

    The Aero Shell Team snarled its way into the air. As usual, their formation was superb. Once the four Texans turned northeast, away from Runway 36, we resumed our conversation. "You've announced for years. What was your favorite formation?" I thought for a moment. Eight or nine people were gathered by the high wing Stinson trimotor's starboard Lycoming, some in the shade, others content to absorb the noon time sun. "Well," I thought out loud. "I did announce the Trimotor Gathering here in 2005....

  • 2,000 Ft. Social Distancing: An Afternoon with a Pilot

    Alexandria Gossen|May 1, 2020

    Written by Alexandria Gossen, a student at Concordia College St. Paul, reprinted with permission from the Hinckley News. Social distancing has become a life-saving lifestyle, but it can be difficult to remain six feet apart from the average human – essential or not. Cambridge resident Greg Regnier has his own way of keeping far away from locals by ascending approximately 2,000 feet into the air. Air Force Veteran Greg Regnier did his usual precheck routine: engine check, wing check, oil check a...

  • Aeromedical Forum

    James D. Lakin PhD MD FACP, CFI,CFII,MEI, Airline Transport Pilot, FAA Senior Medical Examiner|May 1, 2020

    A couple of months ago we talked about the then looming pandemic. Well here it is and it looks like it's going to be around for a while. The good news is that Minnesota has done an effective job of slowing the rate of viral transmission of SARS Cov 2 (Serious Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2) and reducing the rate of development of clinical Covid 19 (Coronavirus 2019) illness. The bad news is that the duration of the epidemic may be prolonged, albeit at a lower intensity. So assuming that you're not going to spend the next two years...

  • The Joy of Flight

    Robert W. Bunke|May 1, 2020

    As I roll to the start of the runway, I look eagerly to the sky for the tower has cleared me for takeoff and again I am committed to fly. As the nose of the airplane lines up with the solid white line on the black, there is a feeling of joy as the engine roars and there is no turning back. With throttle full forward, it isn’t long before the spinning prop becomes so strong and the roll that started slow at first, is racing to free me from the earth. My heart pounds a little, for I can feel that moment of truth is near when a slight backward for...

  • The Mystery Airplane

    Tom Lymburn|May 1, 2020

    Fokker Fodder. Manfred von Richthofen shot down 19 B.E. 2 biplanes and his brother Lothar six. Werner Voss claimed 11. Too slow, poorly armed, and too stable for aerobatics, the Royal Aircraft Factory B.E. 2 appeared in 1912 and served until the Armistice on 11 November 1918. Over 3500 were built, serving on the Western Front, in the Aegean, Africa, Australia, India, Palestine, and Macedonia. On 13 August 1914, it became the first RFC aircraft to land in France. Designed with inherent stability...

  • Upcoming Events

    Check this column each month to see that dates have not been canceled or changed. Send notices six weeks in advance of publication to the Minnesota Flyer, P.O. Box 449, Moose Lake, MN 55767 or, verlena@mnflyer.com. Attention Pilots Be sure to get a Flight Service briefing from (800) WX-Brief before every flight and check your destination airport status. July 5: Austin, MN, Austin, Municipal Airport, Lions Club Fly In Breakfast, Sunday 7:00 AM to 1:00 PM, pancakes, SPAM, sausage, milk, coffee, juice $6.00 per person age five and over, Pilots In...

  • May 1, 2020

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  • Aeromedical Forum

    James D. Lakin PhD MD FACP, CFI,CFII,MEI,Airline Transport Pilot, FAA Senior Aviation Medical Examiner|May 1, 2020

    As I sit in my office at Airlake, a King Air is revving up its engines. Good Lord it's loud and I have the benefit of 30 yards separation and a wall between me and it. Pity the lineman that's out there waving his batons. Ever since Wilbur and Orrville ran their Flyer down the sand at Kitty Hawk the business of powered flight has posed a threat to the hearing of pilots. So how to retain what hearing you have after an adolescence of rock concerts? First of all, let's talk about sound. You may...

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