Minnesota Flyer - Serving Midwest Aviation Since 1960

Articles written by Tom Lymburn

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September Contest Photo Martin AM-1 Mauler

First flying on 26 August 1944 as the XBTM-1, the Mauler was one of four single-seat bomber/torpedo planes ordered for testing by the Navy in 1943. The Curtiss XBTC-2 and the Kaiser-Fleetwings XBTK-1...

 
 By Tom Lymburn    News    October 1, 2020

Confessions of an Airshow Announcer

An ongoing series by Tom Lymburn "Ladies and gentlemen, to your right, on final approach, the greatest transport plane in history. Cameras ready! Please welcome, the Douglas DC-3!" She came "over the...

 

July Contest Photo

The Panavia consortium, formed in March 1969, was charged with the development of the Multi-Role Combat Aircraft (MRCA) for Britain, Germany, and Italy. From this program came the variable geometry...

 

Thomas-Morse S-4C Scout

The Thomas-Morse Aircraft Corporation of Ithaca, NY, built a series of single-seat advanced fighter trainers for the Signal Corps/Air Service beginning in 1917. The S-4B, with the unreliable 100 hp...

 
 By Tom Lymburn    News    August 1, 2020

Confessions of an Airshow Announcer

In three decades of air display announcing, I've been privileged to interview many members of what journalist Tom Brokaw called "The Greatest Generation." This has included members of the Flying...

 

The Mystery Airplane

The C-27J is based on the Fiat G. 222 that first flew on 18 July 1970, and was delivered to Argentina, Italy, Libya, Nigeria, and Thailand. This Lockheed Martin/Alenia development with uprated...

 
 By Tom Lymburn    News    July 1, 2020

Confessions of an Airshow Announcer

I like to walk the field ahead of time. Early morning is best – time to drink in the atmosphere and savor, however briefly, the newly mown grass, listen to the birds that swoop low over the runway...

 

July Mystery Airplane

The Douglas Dolphin evolved from the Sinbad flying boat of July 1930. Looking like the 1929 Saunders-Roe Cutty Sark, the Sinbad was powered by a pair of 300 hp Wright J-5 Whirlwind radials. It...

 
 By Tom Lymburn    News    May 1, 2020

Confessions of an Airshow Announcer-Merlin Magic

The Aero Shell Team snarled its way into the air. As usual, their formation was superb. Once the four Texans turned northeast, away from Runway 36, we resumed our conversation. "You've announced for...

 

The Mystery Airplane

Fokker Fodder. Manfred von Richthofen shot down 19 B.E. 2 biplanes and his brother Lothar six. Werner Voss claimed 11. Too slow, poorly armed, and too stable for aerobatics, the Royal Aircraft...

 
 By Tom Lymburn    News    April 1, 2020

Confessions of an Airshow Announcer... Trimotor Showcase

"Hey, aren't you the dude who announces up at Anoka?" He wore three Canon cameras, all with long expensive telephoto lenses, a sleeveless T-shirt, baggy cargo shorts, and sandals. His nose and...

 

The Mystery Airplane

Carl Bucker, a World War I German naval aviator, founded Svenska Aero in 1921. He returned to Germany along with Swedish designer Anders Andersson in 1932. Established at Berlin-Johannisthal, Bucker...

 

The Mystery Airplane

Donald Luscombe (1895-1965) served in France in WWI as an ambulance driver. It was in France that he took his first flight, in a Voisin pusher. After the Great War, he bought a Curtiss Jenny. His...

 

The Mystery Airplane

Formed in October 1936, with a new factory at Fishermen's Bend, in Melbourne, Australia, Commonwealth Aircraft Corporation (CAC) gave Australia a much needed national facility for aircraft...

 
 By Tom Lymburn    News    January 1, 2020

Confessions of an Airshow Announcer...

Continuing an ongoing series by Tom Lymburn. Some aircraft look right in the air. Nothing compares to the graceful elliptical wing of R.J. Mitchell's classic Merlin engine Spitfire, Kelly Johnson's...

 

The Mystery Airplane Contest

The original Mong Sport flew on May 1, 1953, the creation of Ralph Mong, Jr. Designed around a 65 hp Continental A65, it soon became a popular plans-built airplane, with a maximum speed of 115 mph and...

 

Mystery Airplane

Actor Reginald Denny (1891-1967) flew with the Royal Flying Corps during World War I, first as a gunner on Bristol Fighters, later as a pilot. After the Great War he came to Hollywood to further his...

 
 By Tom Lymburn    News    November 1, 2019

Confessions of an Airshow Announcer

It was a very wet Saturday morning and more heavy rain was forecast. It had been a year for it. Discover Aviation Days had been rained out and Red Wing's weather was less than polite. The motel...

 
 By Tom Lymburn    News    November 1, 2019

Not Our Year: A Desert Disappointment

Sawbones has had a very successful Reno run without any major mechanical problems. Not this year. On a routine flight to burn off the 100LL so the tanks could be filled with racing fuel, the canopy...

 

The Mystery Airplane

Formed in 1922 in Lincoln, Nebraska, by Ray Page, the Nebraska Aircraft Corporation became Lincoln-Page Aircraft in 1927. Lincoln began by rebuilding surplus Standard J-1 biplane trainers into a more...

 

The Mystery Airplane

Societe de Construction d’Avions de Tourisme et d’Affaires was established in 1966 as a subsidiary of Sud-Aviation, later Aerospatiale. It has produced general aviation aircraft like the Horizon,...

 
 By Tom Lymburn    Cover    September 1, 2019

September Cover

The Air Force's new Boeing KC-46A Pegasus air-to-air refueling tanker graced the main ramp. Set to replace or supplement the old KC-135 and KC-10, it's based on the 767 airliner....

 
 By Tom Lymburn    News    September 1, 2019

Sketches and Traditions: Oshkosh 2019

"Mud, mud, glorious mud – Nothing quite like it for cooling the blood..." From "The Hippopotamus Song" by Michael Flanders and Donald Swan More like curdling or boiling the blood. 2019 seemed a...

 

The Mystery Airplane

Glenn Curtiss (1878-1930) was truly one of aviation's great pioneers. He founded the Curtiss Aeroplane Company on 1 December 1910 in Hammondsport, NY. The company evolved through various mergers...

 

Mystery Airplane

Established by the Canadian government in 1944 at Montreal to build a Merlin engined version of the DC-4/C-54, Canadair manufactured its own designs (Argus and Tutor) and license - built F-86 Sabres,...

 

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